George Orwell - Rathbone Place, London, UK
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Master Mariner
N 51° 31.062 W 000° 08.048
30U E 698831 N 5711291
Quick Description: This plaque is attached to the Wheatsheaf public house on the north east side of Rathbone Place in London.
Location: London, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 7/7/2015 1:31:25 AM
Waymark Code: WMP5VA
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member bluesnote
Views: 3

Long Description:

The BBC History website tells us about George Orwell:

Orwell was a British journalist and author, who wrote two of the most famous novels of the 20th century 'Animal Farm' and 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'.

Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair on 25 June 1903 in eastern India, the son of a British colonial civil servant. He was educated in England and, after he left Eton, joined the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, then a British colony. He resigned in 1927 and decided to become a writer. In 1928, he moved to Paris where lack of success as a writer forced him into a series of menial jobs. He described his experiences in his first book, 'Down and Out in Paris and London', published in 1933. He took the name George Orwell, shortly before its publication. This was followed by his first novel, 'Burmese Days', in 1934.

An anarchist in the late 1920s, by the 1930s he had begun to consider himself a socialist. In 1936, he was commissioned to write an account of poverty among unemployed miners in northern England, which resulted in 'The Road to Wigan Pier' (1937). Late in 1936, Orwell travelled to Spain to fight for the Republicans against Franco's Nationalists. He was forced to flee in fear of his life from Soviet-backed communists who were suppressing revolutionary socialist dissenters. The experience turned him into a lifelong anti-Stalinist.

Between 1941 and 1943, Orwell worked on propaganda for the BBC. In 1943, he became literary editor of the Tribune, a weekly left-wing magazine. By now he was a prolific journalist, writing articles, reviews and books.

In 1945, Orwell's 'Animal Farm' was published. A political fable set in a farmyard but based on Stalin's betrayal of the Russian Revolution, it made Orwell's name and ensured he was financially comfortable for the first time in his life. 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' was published four years later. Set in an imaginary totalitarian future, the book made a deep impression, with its title and many phrases - such as 'Big Brother is watching you', 'newspeak' and 'doublethink' - entering popular use. By now Orwell's health was deteriorating and he died of tuberculosis on 21 January 1950.

Wikipedia tells us about the Wheatsheaf:

The Wheatsheaf is a pub in Rathbone Place, Fitzrovia, London, that was popular with London's bohemian set in the 1930s. Customers including George Orwell, Dylan Thomas, Edwin Muir and Humphrey Jennings, were known for a while as the Wheatsheaf writers Other habituées included the singer and dancer Betty May, and the writer and surrealist poet Philip O'Connor, Nina Hamnett, Julian Maclaren-Ross, and Quentin Crisp.

Blue Plaque managing agency: Wheatsheaf Heritage

Individual Recognized: George Orwell

Physical Address:
25 Rathbone Place
London, United Kingdom
W1T 1JB


Web Address: Not listed

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