Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Tower Grove Park - St. Louis, MO
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member YoSam.
N 38° 36.440 W 090° 15.327
15S E 738983 N 4276776
Quick Description: This bust of Mozart was originally sculpted in marble by Howard S. Kretschmar and was dedicated in 1882. The marble bust has been replaced with a resin based replacement due to deterioration of the original.
Location: Missouri, United States
Date Posted: 4/2/2020 5:29:43 AM
Waymark Code: WM1290G
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member fi67
Views: 2

Long Description:

County of statue: Independent City of St. Louis
Location of stature: Grand Music Pavilion, Tower Grove Park, St. Louis
Artist: Unknown, sculptor
Howard S. Kretschmar, 1845-1933, sculptor. (copy after)
Architect: George Ingham Barnett, 1815-1898

Wolfgang Mozart
(1756–1791)
BIRTH DATE: January 27, 1756; Salzburg, Austria
DEATH DATE: December 5, 1791; Vienna, Austria

"A prolific artist, Austrian composer Wolfgang Mozart created a string of operas, concertos, symphonies and sonatas that profoundly shaped classical music.

"Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a musician capable of playing multiple instruments who started playing in public at the age of 6. Over the years, Mozart aligned himself with a variety of European venues and patrons, composing hundreds of works that included sonatas, symphonies, masses, chamber music, concertos and operas, marked by vivid emotion and sophisticated textures.

"Born on January 27, 1756, in Salzburg, Austria, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s was the sole-surviving son of Leopold and Maria Pertl Mozart. Leopold was a successful composer, violinist, and assistant concert master at the Salzburg court. Wolfgang’s mother, Anna Maria Pertl, was born to a middle class family of local community leaders. His only sister was Maria Anna (nicknamed “Nannerl”). With their father’s encouragement and guidance, they both were introduced to music at an early age. Leopold started Nannerl on keyboard when she was seven, as three-year old Wolfgang looked on. Mimicking her playing, Wolfgang quickly began to show a strong understanding of chords, tonality, and tempo. Soon, he too was being tutored by his father.

" ... During this time Mozart also wrote a new opera, Mitridate, re di Ponto for the court of Milan. Other commissions followed and in subsequent trips to Italy, Mozart wrote two other operas, Ascanio in Alba (1771) and Lucio Silla (1772).

"Mozart quickly found work in Vienna, taking on pupils, writing music for publication, and playing in several concerts. He also began writing an opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio) (1780).

"The opera Die Entführung enjoyed immediate and continuing success and bolstered Mozart’s name and talent throughout Europe. With the substantial returns from concerts and publishing, he and Constanze enjoyed a lavish lifestyle. ...

"Toward the end of 1785, Mozart met the librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte, a Venetian composer and poet and together they collaborated on the opera The Marriage of Figaro. It received a successful premiere in Vienna in 1786 and was even more warmly received in Prague later that year. This triumph led to a second collaboration with Da Ponte on the opera Don Giovanni which premiered in 1787 to high acclaim in Prague. Noted for their musical complexity, the two operas are among Mozart’s most important works and are mainstays in operatic repertoire today. Both compositions feature the wicked nobleman, though Figaro is presented more in comedy and portrays strong social tension. Perhaps the central achievement of both operas lies in their ensembles with their close link between music and dramatic meaning.

"Toward the end of the 1780s, Mozart’s fortunes began to grow worse. ... During this time he wrote his last three symphonies and the last of the three Da Ponte operas, Cosi Fan Tutte, which premiered in 1790. ...

"Between 1790 and 1791, now in his mid-thirties, Mozart went through a period of great music productivity and personal healing. Some of his most admired works -- the opera The Magic Flute, the final piano concerto in B-flat, the Clarinet Concerto in A major, and the unfinished Requiem to name a few -- were written during this time. ...

"However, during this time both Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s mental and physical health was deteriorating. In September 1791, he was in Prague for the premiere of the opera La Clemenza di Tito, which he was commissioned to produce for the coronation of Leopold II as King of Bohemia. Mozart recovered briefly to conduct the Prague premiere of The Magic Flute, but fell deeper into illness in November and was confined to bed. Constanze and her sister Sophie came to his side to help nurse him back to health, but Mozart was mentally preoccupied with finishing Requiem, and their efforts were in vain.

" ... In particular, his operas display an uncanny psychological insight, unique to music at the time, and continue to exert a particular fascination for musicians and music lovers today." ~ Biography.com

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