Fort Marcy-Fort Circle Parks - McLean, VA
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member Don.Morfe
N 38° 56.022 W 077° 07.482
18S E 315837 N 4311565
Quick Description: Fort Marcy and nearby Fort Ethan Allen, among other batteries on the northern bank of the Potomac River, were built to protect Leesburg Pike and Chain Bridge. Construction began in 1861. When Fort Marcy was completed, it had a perimeter of 338 feet and mounted 18 guns, a 10-inch mortar and two 24-pounder Coehorn mortars.
Location: Virginia, United States
Date Posted: 1/12/2020 2:37:06 PM
Waymark Code: WM11YMJ
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member QuesterMark
Views: 3

Long Description:
Fort Marcy and nearby Fort Ethan Allen, among other batteries on the northern bank of the Potomac River, were built to protect Leesburg Pike and Chain Bridge. Construction began in 1861. When Fort Marcy was completed, it had a perimeter of 338 feet and mounted 18 guns, a 10-inch mortar and two 24-pounder Coehorn mortars.
The hill on which the fort is located was known as Prospect Hill. Originally the fort was called Fort Baldy Smith after Gen. W.F. Smith, the troops of whose division began construction of the work. His division crossed Chain Bridge on the night of September 24, 1861, and immediately commenced construction of Fort Marcy and Fort Ethan Allen. The 79th New York Highlanders, the 141st Pennsylvania and the Iron Brigade also helped complete the work in the fall of 1862. A force of about 500 contrabands were employed. The 152nd New York worked on the entrenchments, which are still in a very good state of preservation. The site of Fort Marcy is near the location where the famous, but bloodless duel between Henry Clay and John Randolph was fought in 1826.
The fort was not entirely completed until the fall of 1862. It is a relatively undisturbed fort and was named in honor of a native of Massachusetts, the Honorable Randolph B. Marcy, a distinguished soldier, father-in-law, and Chief of Staff to Gen. George B. McClellan. Detachments of the 4th New York Heavy Artillery, 3rd Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery and the 130th Pennsylvania infantry were among the troops that performed garrison duty here during the war. An interesting incident of history is that the body of troops, which afterwards became famous, and the "Iron Brigade" was originated at this fort in the summer of 1861. It was composed of the 19th Indiana, the 2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin Regiments. The 24th Michigan was added to the brigade soon after the battle of South Mountain. These regulars remained together until the close of the war.
After the Civil War ended Fort Marcy was returned to its original owners, the Vanderwerken family. The land remained in the Vanderwerken family until after World War II, when the DeLashmutt family purchased the property.
"Thoughts on Fort Marcy," is a poem written by Lillian Money-Read that was published in the The Washington Post, April 12, 1936. The poem is an eloquent tribute to not only Fort Marcy, but the other forts in the Defenses of Washington system that have, over time, been covered by deciduous forests of American elm, yellow-poplar, and white ash. Today these remnant earthworks are a silent reminder of the protective shield that surrounded the nation’s capital during the Civil War years.
State/States the Park is located...: Virginia

Park Designation: Historic Park/Site

Website From the National Parks Service Page of this Waymark...: [Web Link]

Are pictures included?: yes

Times the Visitors Center (or Park) is Open....: Not listed

Months the Visitors Center/Park is open...: Not listed

SECONDARY website.: Not listed

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