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Princeton Battle Monument - Princeton, NJ
Posted by: Groundspeak Charter Member neoc1
N 40° 20.875 W 074° 39.948
18T E 528381 N 4466427
Quick Description: The Princeton Battle Monument is a contributing structure to the Princeton Historic District. The monument is located in a park between Routes 206 and 27 in Princeton, NJ
Location: New Jersey, United States
Date Posted: 1/3/2019 6:07:55 AM
Waymark Code: WMZTFX
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member BK-Hunters
Views: 0

Long Description:

A 40' Beaux Arts style high relief sculpture honors the men of the Continental Army who fought and won the battle of Princeton on January 3, 1777. In this battle Brigadier General Hugh Mercer and the Continental Army fought against a British force led by Lieutenant Colonel Charles Mawhood. After General Mercer's position was overrun Washington sent reinforcements under Brigadier General John Cadwalader. Washington then arrived with more troops, rallied the army, and forced Colonel Charles Mawhood to retreat back to Trenton.

The Indiana limestone sculpture rests on a granite base. The sculpture was created by Frederick William MacMonnies, Thomas Hastings was the architect, Marion Sims the architect, and the Piccirilli Brothers Marble Carving Studios did the fabrication. The sculpture was dedicated on June 9, 1922.

The high-relief grouping depicts General George Washington facing north. He is wearing a tri-corner hat and cloak while mounted on a horse. He is surrounded by seven of his soldiers in various positions. Immediately below Washington is an allegorical female figure representing Liberty. Surrounding them are seven wounded Revolutionary War soldiers standing, crouching, kneeling and lying down.

The sides of the monument are carved with reliefs of sarcophagi and obelisks that are decorated with trees and weapons and the seals of the states of the original colonies and the seal of the United States.

On the back is the following inscription:

HERE MEMORY LINGERS
TO RECALL
THE GUIDING MIND
WHOSE DARING PLAN
OUTFLANKED THE FOE
AND TURNED DISMAY TO HOPE
WHEN WASHINGTON
WITH SWIFT RESOLVE
MARCHED THROUGH THE NIGHT
TO FIGHT AT DAWN
AND VENTURE ALL
IN ONE VICTORIOUS BATTLE
FOR OUR FREEDOM

A nearby sign explains the significance and history of the monument. it is inscribed:

PRINCETON BATTLE MONUMENT

This Monument, which commemorates the January 3, 1777 Battle of Princeton, depicts Liberty inspiring General Washington as he leads his troops into battle, and the death of General Hugh Mercer. The seals of the United States and the original thirteen states appear on the sides of the Monument, and the inscription on the back was composed by Andrew Fleming West. Commissioned in 1908, the Monument was designed by the Beaux Arts sculptor Frederick MacMonnies with the assistance of architect Thomas Hastings. President Warren G. Harding was present for the 1922 dedication.

In 2006 the Princeton Parks Alliance, in carrying out the vision of Princeton Borough Major Joseph O’Neill, undertook a project to permanently illuminate the Monument. As with the original construction of the Monument, local citizens responded with generous donations. The Monument lighting was funded with gifts from Princeton University, Sara and Alexander Buck, Randy and Herb Hobler, Betty Johnson, Douglas F. Bushnell, Marie and Edward Matthews, Barbara and Art Morgan, The Gordon and Llura Gund Foundation, Betsy and Tod Peyton, Joan and Bill Schreyer, Charles C. Townsend Jr., Andrew Kootz and Laurie Harmon, Wendy and Peter Benchley, Sherry MacLean, and many more. Additional funding from the State of New Jersey was made possible through the efforts of Assemblyman Reed Gusciora.

Name of Historic District (as listed on the NRHP): Princeton Historic District

Link to nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com page with the Historic District: [Web Link]

Address:
Between Routes 206 and 27 Princeton, NJ


How did you determine the building to be a contributing structure?: Other (Please explain in the Private Message field)

Optional link to narrative or database: [Web Link]

NRHP Historic District Waymark (Optional): Not listed

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