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Mile Zero-Kettle Valley Rail Trail - Midway, BC
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member BK-Hunters
N 49° 00.708 W 118° 47.155
11U E 369407 N 5430304
Quick Description: This is Mile 0, the eastern terminus of the Kettle Valley Rail Trail. It is at the Kettle River Museum, across Highway 3 from the town of Midway, which is 19 km. east of Rock Creek and 50 km. west of Grand Forks.
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Date Posted: 1/19/2014 2:35:38 PM
Waymark Code: WMJZ0A
Published By: Groundspeak Regular Member condor1
Views: 0

Long Description:
The Kettle Valley Rail Trail totals 450 km in length, stretching from Midway in the east to Hope in the west. It is broken down into major sections and much smaller subsections. This section, as one heads west, is the Midway to Penticton section, which is broken into seven smaller sections, varying from 14 to 53 km. in length. The first section, Midway to Rock Creek, is 18.2 km. in length. Between Midway and Penticton the trail varies in elevation from 600 metres at Midway to 1300 metres at the Myra Canyon Summit near Kelowna.

An Overview - Midway to Penticton
18.2 km: Midway to Rock Creek
Starting from behind the Kettle River Museum in Midway, the terrain is relatively flat as you cycle through rolling farmland valleys following the Kettle River west to Rock Creek. You will pass through a number of gates on this section – please be sure to close them behind you.

14.8 km: Rock Creek to Westbridge
From here the trail begins to head northwest to Westbridge which is a the junction of the Kettle River and the West Kettle River at km 33. Although the trail is climbing throughout this section, it is at a very gentle grade.

35 km: Westbridge to Beaverdell
From Westbridge the trail continues north following the West Kettle River to Beaverdell at km 68. Turn left at Rhone Road to visit the Kettle River Caboose at Paul Lataurd’s Cyclists rest stop. Follow this past the Little Dipper Campground until you see the trail again on your left. Continue on to Beaverdell through the gorge and slightly uphill.

53 km: Beaverdell to Idabel & McCulloch Lakes
From Beaverdell there is quite a long stretch between villages and services so be sure to plan ahead. Arlington Lakes is a lovely lunch spot about midway, then continue to climb to the lakes region of Idabel Lake (slightly off the trail) and McCulloch Lake (Hydraulic Lake) at Km 121.

14 km: McCulloch Lake to Myra Canyon
Arriving at Myra Canyon at Km 135 you will be approximately 1000 metres above the city of Kelowna. It is well worth taking your time here and stopping for plenty of photos as you cross the 18 trestle bridges over the canyon. If you are planning an extended layover at Kelowna you can depart the trail at either either end of the canyon – Myra Station or Ruth Station. Just beware the ride back up will be challenging!

36.4 km: Myra Canyon to Chute Lake
The next stop is Chute Lake with a rustic Lodge, full of character! camping and some supplies at km 171.4. There are paddle boats you can hire and be sure to try the pie!

26.6 or 43.6: Chute Lake to Naramata & Penticton
From Chute Lake the trail descends and you will now know have much you have actually climbed as you look out over the beautiful Okanagan Lake and valley. Be careful on some sandy sections, especially later in summer. We highly recommend a stop over in Naramata but beware the climb back to the trail. Or continue through tunnels, vineyards and orchards to Penticton at Km 215.
From the KVR

Parking and washrooms are available at the trailhead and throughout the trail. Various facilities are available along the trail as it passes through several towns.

This trailhead is also the western terminus of the Columbia and Western Rail Trail, which heads east to Castlegar. The Columbia and Western Trail is 162 KM long from Castlegar, British Columbia to Midway, B.C. and travels the abandoned Canadian Pacific Boundary Subdivision with the last train going thru in 1991. In 2000 the C.P.R. donated the line to the Province of British Columbia for a recreational trail to form the British Columbia's Trans-Canada Trail network.

Trailhead/trail website: [Web Link]

Trail allowances or restrictions:
Hiking, biking, cross country skiing, horses and dogs allowed. No motorized vehicles.


Trail type: Highly variable - dirt, sand, gravel, crushed rock

Parking: Not Listed

Visit Instructions:
To claim a log for this waymark, some proof of a visit is required. This proof could be a simple photo of their GPS at the trailhead, a photo of the person at the trailhead, or a photo of a signature item that a person uses for photographs, at the trailhead.

In order to help other waymarkers who are looking for a nice hike/walk outdoors, you are encouraged to provide good feedback about the quality of the hike/trail.
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