Branch Rickey - Rushtown, Ohio
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Sneakin Deacon
N 38° 50.535 W 083° 01.441
17S E 324340 N 4301217
Quick Description: As a baseball executive with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Branch Rickey signed Jackie Robinson to a Major League Baseball contract allowing him to become the first black player in the Major Leagues.
Location: Ohio, United States
Date Posted: 3/30/2013 8:14:45 PM
Waymark Code: WMGQ6H
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member rangerroad
Views: 4

Long Description:
Branch Rickey was born in Stockdale, Ohio and attended Ohio Wesleyan University where he played baseball. After serving as an officer in World War I, Rickey returned home to become a baseball executive with the St. Louis Cardinals. During his time with the Cardinals Rickey is credited with developing system of minor league teams, which he used to groom talent for the Major League Cardinals. This system was so successful that by the late 1920’s and early 1930’s the Cardinal’s “Gashouse Gang” was the most successful team in the National League. For more than 20 years, under Rickey’s leadership the Cardinals remained near the top of the Major Leagues. In 1942, Rickey left the Cardinals to become President and General Manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers. . It was during his time with the Dodgers that Rickey made his most significant contribution to not only baseball but to the American Culture. In 1946 he signed Jackie Robinson to a minor league contract and assigned him to play for the Dodger Farm Team in Montreal, Canada. This set the stage for Robinson to become the first black player in the Major Leagues. On April 15, 1947, as a result of Branch Rickey’s courage and foresight, Jackie Roosevelt Robinson became the first Negro to play in a Major League Game. Rickey continue his involvement in Major League Baseball until ill health forced him to resign in 1955. After retirement, Rickey was a much sought after speaker. It was during an appearance in Columbia Missouri in November 1955 that Rickey fell ill and collapsed. He would die a month later on December 9, 1955. Branch Rickey is resting in the Rushtown Cemetery in Scioto County, Ohio.
Source/Credit: (visit link)
Description:
Branch Rickey was born in Stockdale, Ohio on December 20, 1881. He attend Ohio Wesleyan University where he was the catcher on the baseball team. Branch Rickey played Major League Baseball for the St. Louis Browns and the New York Highlanders from 1905 – 1907. He struggled as a player and in 1913 embarked on a career as a baseball executive. Rickey served as an officer in World War I and commanded a chemical training unit that also included future baseball greats Ty Cobb and Christy Mathewson. Following the war Rickey returned to St. Louis and became president of the St. Louis Cardinal. In 1920, he gave up the presidency but continued to serve as the Cardinals on field manage until early in the 1925 season when he was fired and replaced by Rogers Hornsby. During his years a manager Rickey invested in several minor league teams and used them to develop future major league talent. This innovation led to the development of the Major League “Farm System.” Thanks to Rickey’s farm system the Cardinals of the later 1920’s and early 1930’s were known as the “Gashouse Gang” and were the class of the National League. The won the 1931 World Series. Such stars as Dizzy and Paul Dean, Pepper Martin and Joe Medwick were all product of Ricky’s Farm System. Rickey continued to develop the Cardinals up until the early 1940s. In his final year at St. Louis, 1942, the Cardinals had their best season in franchise history, winning 106 games and the World Series title. The team was led by a new crop of players developed by the Cardinals, two of whom, Enos Slaughter and Stan Musial, became Hall of Famers. In 1942 Rickey left St. Louis to become President and General Manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers. It was during his time with the Dodgers that Rickey made his most significant contribution to not only baseball but to the American Culture. In 1946 he signed Jackie Robinson to a minor league contract and assigned him to play for the Dodger Farm Team in Montreal, Canada. This set the stage for Robinson to become the first black player in the Major Leagues. On April 15, 1947, as a result of Branch Rickey’s courage and foresight, Jackie Roosevelt Robinson became the first negro to play in a Major League Game. In the Months that followed Monte Irvin became the first black player in the American League when Bill Veeck signed him to play for the Cleveland Indians. In the 1950’s Rickey’s health began to decline forcing him to retire in 1955. After his retirement from baseball, Rickey sought after as a public speaker. It was during one of these speaking engagements in November of 1965 at the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame in Columbia, Missouri that he collapsed. He died on December 9, 1965. Branch Rickey is buried in the Rushtown Cemetery in Scioto County, Ohio.


Date of birth: 12/20/1881

Date of death: 12/9/1965

Area of notoriety: Sports

Marker Type: Headstone

Setting: Outdoor

Visiting Hours/Restrictions: Daily - Daylight Hours

Fee required?: No

Web site: [Web Link]

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