Mission Concepcion - San Antonio Texas
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member teeoff2
N 29° 23.467 W 098° 29.484
14R E 549350 N 3251426
Quick Description: Excellet example of 18th century Frieze work on this mission in San Antonio Texas
Location: Texas, United States
Date Posted: 5/18/2009 9:51:31 AM
Waymark Code: WM6DNE
Published By: Groundspeak Regular Member GT.US
Views: 21

Long Description:
Taken from the following website: (visit link)

Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purisima Concepción de Acuña

This handsome stone church was dedicated in 1755, and appears very much as it did over two centuries ago. It stands proudly as the oldest unrestored stone church in America. In its heyday, colorful geometric designs covered its surface, but the patterns have long since faded or been worn away. However, original frescos are still visible in several of the rooms.

Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción de Acuña

This mission was named in honor of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception and Juan de Acuña, the Marqués de Casafuerte. The Marqués was Viceroy of New Spain (Mexico) when the mission transferred to the San Antonio River area in 1731.


Transfer of the Mission

Originally founded in 1716 in what is now eastern Texas, the mission was one of six authorized by the government to serve as a buffer against the threat of French incursion into Spanish territory from Louisiana.

Developed by Franciscans and after a tenuous existence and several moves, the mission was transferred to its present site in 1731.

This handsome stone church took about 20 years to build, and was dedicated in 1755. It appears very much as it did over two centuries ago. Due to the fact that it was built directly on bedrock, it never lost its roof, or its integrity. It remains the least restored of the colonial structures within the Park.

In its heyday, colorful geometric designs covered its surface inside and out. The exterior patterns have long since faded or been worn away. However, there are several rooms in which to see remaining frescos with all their detail and creativity.

Until preservation work in 1988 revealed a second eye, this fresco on the convento ceiling was known as the "Eye of God".

Frescos

The integrity of the church and convento roofs at Mission Concepción prevented the deterioration of many fine examples of frescos. This tediously applied art form covered the front of the church and most of the church and convento interiors. Today only four rooms clearly show remnants of these colorful designs painted over 250 years ago.

While many of the existing frescos are simply decorative, several are symbolic. The most famous fresco, located on the convento room ceiling, is a possible depiction of God as a mestizo.


The Church Architecture

The church of Mission Concepción is an excellent example of Spanish Colonial architecture. A variety of features were incorporated into the construction of this and other existing mission churches in the park. Intricate Renaissance and Moorish details complement Romanesque forms and gothic arches. It is a cruciform (cross-shaped) building of limestone. The roof is vaulted with a dome, with which recent research is suggesting a deliberate placement of windows to illuminate the altars on specific feast days. Twin bell towers may have been topped by crosses similar to those in place today. Colorful Moorish designs mix with images showing both Native American and Spanish Catholic influences.

Mission builders, skilled master craftsmen recruited from Mexico, preserved the basic Spanish model, with modifications dictated by frontier conditions. The quarry from which the mission Indians dug the stone to build their community is located on the grounds of Mission Concepción. The church walls are 45 inches thick; however only the inside and outside facings are of solid stone - between the two layers is a filling of small stones and building debris. The native residents of the missions provided labor for the building of these churches. This activity was one way to foster a sense of community and provide a means of training the mission residents as artisans.






Address:
located at 807 Mission Road, San Antonio, Texas, 78210


Web URL to relevant information: [Web Link]

Artist: Not listed

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