Living Prairie Museum History - Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member PM8
N 49° 53.540 W 097° 16.326
14U E 624106 N 5528091
Quick Description: A sign describing the history of the Living Prairie Museum
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Date Posted: 8/31/2020 8:02:06 AM
Waymark Code: WM132AV
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member bluesnote
Views: 0

Long Description:
The sign is located on the north fence of the museum property, along the Yellow Ribbon Greenway Trail. There is a gap in the fence here to allow access to the walking trails on the grounds. A succession of aerial photos on the sign shows the changes in the area from 1948 to 1998.

MUSEUM HISTORY

Prairie is more than flat land. It is home to hundreds of grass, wildflower and animal species. The eastern portion of the vast North American grasslands is known as tall grass prairie.

Originally covering 650,000 square kilometres from southern Manitoba to the Texas border, this ecosystem was, as its name suggests, dominated by tall grasses.

Settlement of the prairie region was rapid and brought unprecedented landscape change. In less than 100 years, demand for agricultural and residential land resulted in the degradation and destruction of the tall grass prairie.

TODAY, LESS THAN 0.1% OF THIS ENDANGERED ECOSYSTEM REMAINS IN NORTH AMERICA.

OVER 150 DIFFERENT GRASS AND WILDFLOWER SPECIES

In 1968, a sub-committee of the International Biological Program surveyed Manitoba for native plant communities. One of the largest, uncultivated tall grass prairie sites was discovered in the residential area of St. James-Assiniboia, part of which was set aside in 1971 as a City of Winnipeg nature park. It is now the Living Prairie Museum: a 13 hectare site featuring more than 150 different grass and wildflower species. It is a unique remnant of our natural heritage preserved for the education and delight of future generations.

The Interpretive Centre showcases exhibits on prairie history and ecology and offers educational opportunities for both school groups and the public alike. The observation deck provides a glimpse of the 'sea of grasses' as described by the early settlers and our bookstore has a great selection of prairie books and native seeds.

Here, we host workshops, special events, free family programming, and best of all, the chance to learn about nature in nature.

1968
DISCOVERY OF HABITAT IMPORTANCE

1971
ESTABLISHMENT AS A NATURE PARK

1975
CONSTRUCTION OF INTERPRETIVE CENTRE

PRESENT
Marker Name: Museum History

Agency: Living Prairie Museum

Languages: English

Location:
There are two ways to access the marker: On the Yellow Ribbon Greenway Trail south of Cree Crescent access, or, via the Living Prairie Museum trails (2795 Ness Avenue) to the north fence.


Marker Text:
MUSEUM HISTORY Prairie is more than flat land. It is home to hundreds of grass, wildflower and animal species. The eastern portion of the vast North American grasslands is known as tall grass prairie. Originally covering 650,000 square kilometres from southern Manitoba to the Texas border, this ecosystem was, as its name suggests, dominated by tall grasses. Settlement of the prairie region was rapid and brought unprecedented landscape change. In less than 100 years, demand for agricultural and residential land resulted in the degradation and destruction of the tall grass prairie. TODAY, LESS THAN 0.1% OF THIS ENDANGERED ECOSYSTEM REMAINS IN NORTH AMERICA. OVER 150 DIFFERENT GRASS AND WILDFLOWER SPECIES In 1968, a sub-committee of the International Biological Program surveyed Manitoba for native plant communities. One of the largest, uncultivated tall grass prairie sites was discovered in the residential area of St. James-Assiniboia, part of which was set aside in 1971 as a City of Winnipeg nature park. It is now the Living Prairie Museum: a 13 hectare site featuring more than 150 different grass and wildflower species. It is a unique remnant of our natural heritage preserved for the education and delight of future generations. The Interpretive Centre showcases exhibits on prairie history and ecology and offers educational opportunities for both school groups and the public alike. The observation deck provides a glimpse of the 'sea of grasses' as described by the early settlers and our bookstore has a great selection of prairie books and native seeds. Here, we host workshops, special events, free family programming, and best of all, the chance to learn about nature in nature. 1968 DISCOVERY OF HABITAT IMPORTANCE 1971 ESTABLISHMENT AS A NATURE PARK 1975 CONSTRUCTION OF INTERPRETIVE CENTRE PRESENT


Website: [Web Link]

Link to HistoricPlaces.ca or mhs.mb.ca: [Web Link]

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PM8 visited Living Prairie Museum History - Winnipeg, Manitoba 9/1/2020 PM8 visited it