St Michael and All Angels - Alsop-en-le-Dale, Derbyshire
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member SMacB
N 53° 05.586 W 001° 45.740
30U E 582879 N 5883343
Quick Description: Medieval church of St Michael and All Angels, Alsop-en-le-Dale.
Location: East Midlands, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 12/21/2019 2:14:02 AM
Waymark Code: WM11V57
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Alfouine
Views: 1

Long Description:
"St Michael & All Angels’ Church is located within the Diocese of Derby and is a member of the Parwich Benefice. The church serves a small hamlet of around 140 people including Alsop Moor, Cold Eaton and Newton Grange.

The church was founded in the 12th century and retains its Norman nave and doorway with a double chevron moulding, as well as a font and window of the same period. There is an ancient piscina in the north chancel wall for the ceremonial washing of hands by the priest and a pulpit, both predating the renovations. The present church comprising a chancel, 32ft nave and tower, housing a bell dating from 1892, was renovated in the late 19th century at a cost of £840 and reopened in 1883. An account of the reopening published in the Derby Mercury can be read here. The old stone corbels of the earlier roof show below the nave and the tower is imitation Norman being built in 1882 by F J Robinson. The font is circular tapering lightly towards the base. To mark the Millennium year 2000, a stained glass window was commissioned by the artist, Henry Haig. Designed on the theme of “I saw a new heaven and a new earth” (Revelations 21:1), the window was dedicated by the Bishop of Derby on 30 September 2001. The church is listed Grade II.

According to The History and Topography of Ashbourn and the Valley of the Dove (1839) Alsop provided sanctuary to Thomas Becon in Tudor times:

“Taking the Buxton Road from Ashbourn, through Fenny Bentley, leaving Tissington (one of the most pleasing rural seclusions in Derbyshire), half a mile to the right hand we enter upon a bleak, monotonous country, intersected by stone walls…At one end of this dell, almost shut out from the traveller’s view, is a little village, consisting of a few farmhouses, the church, and the remains of the ancient manor house, to which has been given the appropriate name, Alsop-in-the-Dale. In this neighbourhood it was that Thomas Becon, one of the British Reformers, took refuge from the furious persecution of his enemies during the reign of Henry VIII.”

The church building is open during the hours of day light."

SOURCE - (visit link)
Building Materials: Stone

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