St Mary - Burrough on the Hill, Leicestershire
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member SMacB
N 52° 41.365 W 000° 52.852
30U E 643225 N 5839829
Quick Description: St Mary, Burrough on the Hill, a beautiful medieval church with famous connections, a 13th century font and lancet window and 15th century stone effigies.
Location: East Midlands, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 8/17/2019 2:11:11 AM
Waymark Code: WM1152E
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member pmaupin
Views: 1

Long Description:
St Mary, Burrough on the Hill, a beautiful medieval church with famous connections, a 13th century font and lancet window and 15th century stone effigies.

"At the east end of the south aisle is the stone effigy of a man in armour, his feet resting on a lion, and in the north aisle are the remains of a woman's effigy. These are thought to represent William Stockton (d1470) and Margaret, his wife. A mural tablet in the north aisle commemorates Edward Cheseldyn (d1691), his mother in law, wife and daughter (1691-1718); another is to Charnel Cave (d1792) with members of his family (1787-1833).

There are also tablets in the church to William Brown (d1814), rector; to Evelyn Burnaby, rector, 1873-83; to his wife and infant daughter (d1873); and to his father, Revd GA Burnaby (d1872). Other tablets include those to WA Peake (d1912) and Sir Raymond Greene, Bt (d1947).

Stained glass windows are in memory of members of the Peake, Burnaby, and Chaplin families. The font is a fine example of the early 13th century. It consists of a bulbous circular bowl decorated with a band of foliage, below which is a row of pointed arches filled alternately with masks and rosettes. The stem has ten engaged shafts, the alternate vertical mouldings between them being enriched with dog tooth ornament. A dog tooth moulding also decorates the circular base."

SOURCE - (visit link)

"The church at Burrough was given, perhaps by Robert Grimbald, to Owston Abbey shortly after its foundation and before 1166. The advowson remained in the possession of the abbey until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown. An unsuccessful claim to present was made in 1383 by Robert de Stockton. Although the advowson was sold to Sir Edward Montague in 1544 and passed to Richard Burrough in 1546, the queen presented in 1574. A presentation was made by St. John Burrough in 1578 and thereafter the advowson descended with the two Burrough manors. Two lords of the manor were themselves rectors- William Brown (d. 1814) and Evelyn Burnaby, 1873- 83. The Peake family secured the advowson, and the Revd. J. D. Peake was presented to the living in 1895. In 1928 Maj. A. Coats of Burrough Hall was patron. The benefice was united with that of Somerby in 1954, and it was agreed that the patron, Lt.-Col. F. G. Peake, should present alternately with the Diocesan Board of Patronage, patrons of Somerby.

The rectory of Burrough was valued at 3 marks in 1217 and 1254, and at 10 marks in 1291. In 1535 it was worth £12 net. In 1831 the rectory was worth £449 a year. The grant of the manor to Sir Edward Montague in 1544 included two pensions, one of 30s. which had been paid to Langley Priory before the Dissolution, and a second of 13s. 4d., formerly paid by Burrough church to Owston Abbey. In 1220 the Abbot of Owston had also received a pound of incense a year from this church. In 1220 the canons of St. Edith's church at Tamworth (Staffs.) took two-thirds of the demesne tithes, presumably under a gift from the Marmions, the lords of Tamworth; there is no later evidence of the canons exercising this right.

In 1607 the rector held two yardlands of glebe. After the inclosure the rectors held 66 a., and there were 73 a. in 1843. The tithes on 1,317 a., payable to the Rector of Burrough, were in 1843 commuted for £263 8s., and those on 238 a., payable to the Vicar of Somerby, for £47 12s. Land immediately north of the village, all the property in the lane on the north-east side of the church, and some closes and orchards in the village street paid tithes to Somerby, and c. 1955 it was believed that this part of the village had at one time been considered part of Somerby parish for all ecclesiastical purposes. The rent-charges arising from the tithes in Burrough payable to the Vicar of Somerby were redeemed in 1922.

The former rectory house stands immediately south-west of the churchyard, occupying the same position as the parsonage of 1607. It is built of ironstone and limestone and dates largely from about 1873 when it is said to have been modernized for the rector. The lower part of the back wing survives from the older building. The house was sold in 1954 and the incumbent of the united benefices of Burrough and Somerby has continued to live at Somerby Vicarage.

The church of ST. MARY THE VIRGIN stands on high ground on the north-west side of the village street. It consists of a chancel, a clerestoried nave, north and south aisles, a south porch, and a west tower with a vestry to the north of it. The fabric is of ironstone and limestone and the roofs are of lead. The oldest parts of the church probably date from the early 13th century, and a round-headed lancet window in the south wall of the chancel may indicate a date as early as 1200. A similar 'low side' window in the north wall has a pointed head. The nave arcades date from the early 13th century and consist of three pointed arches supported on circular piers with 'water-holding' bases. Hoodmoulds to the arches have carved masks as stops and keystones. Both arcades lean outwards, particularly that on the north side. The wide lancent windows of the clerestory may be of the same date as the arcades or a little later. The font is a fine example of the early 13th century. It consists of a bulbous circular bowl decorated with a band of foliage, below which is a row of pointed arches filled alternately with masks and rosettes. The stem has ten engaged shafts, the alternate vertical mouldings between them being enriched with dog-tooth ornament. A dog-tooth moulding also decorates the circular base. The lower part of the tower dates from the 13th century but the much-restored belfry stage and the arcaded parapet which surmounts it were originally built in the 14th. The parapet is decorated with ball-flower ornament and a short octagonal spire rises from behind it.

Extensive alterations to the church took place in the 14th century when the aisles were probably rebuilt and the south porch added. Several of the windows are of this date and the south aisle contains a trefoil-headed piscina. The chancel appears to have been altered at much the same period. The roofs are of low pitch; a dated timber in the nave suggests that they were renewed in 1657. The roof principals rest on medieval carved corbels. Attempts to strengthen the tower were made in the 17th century. A large buttress dated 1629 was erected in the middle of the south wall and two others were built against the west wall. In 1791 the tower was leaning to the south-west in spite of the buttresses, and was said to be in 'a very decayed state'. By 1795 it had been repaired.

A restoration of the church was carried out by Henry Goddard of Leicester in 1860 when traces of the colour with which the aisles and roof had been adorned were found. At the same time the font was restored and new pews, altar rails, and pulpit were installed. The chancel was rebuilt in 1867 when the present east window was inserted. In 1878 the tower and spire were completely rebuilt, omitting the 17th-century buttresses, and a vestry was added against the north wall. The architect was Charles Kirk of Sleaford (Lincs.). The outer walls of the church were repaired in 1893. After the First World War inscribed oak panelling was installed in the porch to commemorate those who served in the war.

At the east end of the south aisle is the stone effigy of a man in armour, his feet resting on a lion, and in the north aisle are the remains of a woman's effigy. These are thought to represent William Stockton (d. 1470) and Margaret, his wife. The inscriptions, which were noted by Burton, have disappeared. These monuments, together with one (now missing) to another William Stockton (d. 1537) and his wife, were formerly in the north aisle where Throsby saw them in 1790 and remarked that they were 'treated as rubbish'. A mural tablet in the north aisle commemorates Edward Cheseldyn (d. 1691), his mother-in-law, wife, and daughter (1691-1718); another is to Charnel Cave (d. 1792) with members of his family (1787-1833). There are also tablets in the church to William Brown (d. 1814), rector; to Evelyn Burnaby, rector, 1873-83; to his wife and infant daughter (d. 1873); and to his father, the Revd. G. A. Burnaby (d. 1872). Other tablets include those to W. A. Peake (d. 1912) and Sir Raymond Greene, Bt. (d. 1947). Stained glass windows are in memory of members of the Peake, Burnaby, and Chaplin families.

The plate includes a silver cup with cover paten of 1670. A silver cup and flagon were given by Frederick Peake in 1870. There are 4 bells: (i) and (ii) 1600 and 1609, both recast in 1798; (iii) 1619; (iv) 1730, recast in 1813. The registers date from 1612 and are complete."

SOURCE - (visit link)
Building Materials: Stone

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