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The Civil War Comes to Washington - Washington, MO
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member YoSam.
N 38° 33.206 W 091° 00.933
15S E 672919 N 4269089
Quick Description: Historic marker at the truss bridge over Busch Creek to the Brewery. It records the German's actions in the war in this local.
Location: Missouri, United States
Date Posted: 5/9/2018 5:19:08 AM
Waymark Code: WMY89M
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member iconions
Views: 2

Long Description:

County of marker: Franklin County
Location of marker: W. 8th St., W. of Jefferson St., at bridge, Washington
Marker erected: 2000
Marker erected by: Washington Historical Society; Veterans Hall of Honor, Franklin County, Missouri; Washington, Missouri, Chamber of Commerce

Marker text:

The Civil War
Comes To

WASHINGTON

The John B. Busch Washington
Brewery And Malt House

In about 1854 John Baptiste Busch together with his older brother, Henry Busch, and a friend, Fred Gersie, started the Washington Brewery and Malt House at Jefferson and Eighth Street. John and Henry were the sons of Ulrich and Barbara Busch from the Rhineland area of Germany. John was born in 1832 in Darmstadt, Germany and moved to the United States in 1849, first living in St. Louis, and then moving to Washington. He was one of twenty-three children fathered by Ulrich.

On the 2nd of October 1864 the Confederate troops came to Washington under the command of General Marmaduke. It was a common practice during the Civil War for the confiscation of supplies, horses, and other needed items, or simply looting of the local population.

But on arriving in Washington, the Confederate soldiers found a more desirable prize at the brewery. Reports state that almost all the beer was consumed by Confederate troops, even drank some of the green unfermented beer. The remaining beer was poured into Busch Creek. In 1870, John B. Busch submitted the following claim:

"Statement of property taken or destroyed by Price's Raid October 1, 1864 while John B. Busch, 1st Lieutenant, Company L, 54th Enrolled Missouri Militia mustered into U.S. service as such and lost the property while in service"
600 Barrels Beer ....................10.00.....$6000.00
2000 Bushels of Barley & Malt.........1.00.....$2000.00
500 Bushels Oats...............................$150.00
300 ft. Rubber Hose...................1.00.....$300.00
3 Large Casks........................75.00.....$375.00
1 Safe.........................................$300.00
2 Desks..............................25.00.....$50.00
5 Horses............................200.00.....$1000.00
4 Pair Harnesses.....................25.00.....$100.00
2 Saddles............................10.00.....$20.00
1 Spring Wagon......................150.00.....$150.00
300 Large Sacks.......................1.00.....$300.00
1 Box Wagon....................................$50.00
...............................................$10,795.00

The bill was never paid, possibly because it was submitted so long after the war.

John B. Busch died in 1894 and is buried at Wildey Cemetery in Washington . In 1953 his grandson, Ulrich Busch, Jr., locked the doors of the Washington Brewery for the final time. John's younger brother, Adolphus Busch, had also started a brewery which still operates today. Anheuser Busch Brewery of St. Louis.


Henry (Heinrich) Conrad Eitzen,
A Civil War Soldier
Henry Eitzen was born in Bremen, Germany on 30 May 1827, and immigrated into the United States on 11 November 1844 through the Port of New Orleans, Louisiana. First living in Gasconade County, Eitzen later moved to Washington. He operated a general store on the southeast corner of Second and Jefferson Streets for many years.

Henry Eitzen's first military experience in the United States was during the Mexican War, serving as a Private in Captain Francis W. Boing's Company, 3rd Regiment, Missouri Volunteers. His Mexican War duty lasted only about two months.

At the beginning of the Civil War, Eitzen joined Company A, of the Franklin County Home Guard as a Sergeant under Captain Franz Wilhelmi, serving for three months. Captain Henry served as the Assistant Provost Marshal which he resigned on 15 July 1863. He then joined the 54th Enrolled Missouri Militia where he achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. However, he was relieved of duty by the Missouri Governor Hamilton Rowan Gamble. This action was attributed to differing political views between the governor and Eitzen. During the time-period of Prices's Raid in 1864, he held the reduced rank of Private, following enlistment with Company A, 54th Enrolled Missouri Militia under Captain Robert Reichard.

A number of the militia members were considered "Radical Unionists", and Eitzen was among them. Even though the governor gave no specific reason for Eitzen and others being relieved from duty, they were known to have disagreements. The Radical Unionists advocated immediate emancipation of slaves. Militia members were also being investigated in the death of a southern sympathizer, James Barnes, and imprisoning other southerners. A substantial number of complaints were voiced in 1863 accusing Eitzen and other militia members of harsh questioning concerning the loyalty of some voters.

Following the Civil War he lived in Washington, St. Louis, Columbia, and Kansas City. Henry Eitzen passed away 7 September 1910 and is buried with most of his family at Wildey Cemetery in Washington.


Western Turner Rifles
During the Civil War there were a number of Union units raised in Franklin County including Home Guard, State Militias, and Volunteer units. The most iconic unit raised from Washington was Company G, 17th Missouri Volunteer Infantry, known as the Western Turner Rifles. Along with tens of thousands of Germans crossing the Atlantic in the mid-nineteenth century, came the immigrant's hopes and dreams. In addition, their strong views on politics, religion, philosophy, and ideals for creating strong citizenship came as well. Chief among their ideals was the concept of the "Turn Verein" or Turning Society. The Turner motto of "A strong mind is a strong body" was adopted by the membership who sought advancement mentally and physically. In 1859, Franz Wilhelmi played an active role in the establishment of the Turn Verein in Washington, and would become a Captain commanding Company G of the 17th Missouri Volunteers. The Turners encouraged physical exercise, enacted dramatic performances, sang in harmony, played musical instruments, held social functions, and even practiced marksmanship. At the beginning of the Civil War, the vast majority of the young men of the Turner Society heeded the call of their adoptive country and joined the Union military, forming the German-American Company G, 17th Missouri Volunteer Infantry.

This Civil War unit served in many campaigns in Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. They participated in General Sherman's famous "March to the Sea." At Savannah, Georgia many of the three year volunteers left to return home, ending their service commitment. Members that remains were transferred to the 15th Missouri Infantry Volunteers and were mustered out of Federal service December 25, 1865.

After members of Company G, 17th Missouri Infantry Volunteers returned to Washington, the Turner Hall was built in 1866, located at Jefferson and Third Street. The Grand Army Of The Republic Union Camp, a veterans organization, was established at Union and named in honor of Captain Franz Wilhelmi.

Date Installed or Dedicated: 1/1/2000

Name of Government Entity or Private Organization that built the monument: Washington Historical Society; Veterans Hall of Honor, Franklin County, Missouri; Washington, Missouri, Chamber of Commerc

Union, Confederate or Other Monument: Union

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