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Battle of Stoney Creek (War of 1812) - Stoney Creek, Ontario
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member Bon Echo
N 43° 13.109 W 079° 45.864
17T E 600354 N 4785819
Quick Description: The Battle of Stoney Creek took place here during the War of 1812.
Location: Ontario, Canada
Date Posted: 1/21/2018 6:13:58 PM
Waymark Code: WMXK0Z
Published By: Groundspeak Charter Member BruceS
Views: 15

Long Description:

The Battle of Stoney Creek was likely one of the shortest battles during the War of 1812, and yet it is also considered to be one of the most decisive victories for the British army during that struggle. The battle itself, essentially a night attack by the British on the encamped American forces, reportedly lasted all of 45 minutes.

The Battle of Stoney Creek was fought in the pre-dawn hours of June 6th, 1813. The battle saw an attack of approximately 700 British soldiers on a much larger force of 3,500 Americans. Although losses on both sides were small, the British did manage to capture two American Brigadier-Generals and caused enough confusion in the American ranks that the American force retreated. Subsequent harassment by the British forces led to the Americans retreating back to Fort George and prevented a deeper penetration of American forces into Upper Canada (now Ontario) from the Niagara frontier. The Battle of Stoney Creek represents the last time the American army seriously threatened the people living in the communities in and around Hamilton.
Source: http://1812tour.hamilton.ca/stoney_creek.html

Although nearby Battlefield Park is largely associated with the Battle of Stoney Creek - it is the location of the Gage farmhouse, the Battlefield Monument, and of the annual re-enactment of the Battle of Stoney Creek - it was near the present day Smith's Knoll monument where the fiercest struggle was reported to have taken place. The coordinates for this waymark will bring you to a the Smith's Knoll Monument, where a plaque reads:

THE BATTLEFIELD OF STONEY CREEK
6TH JUNE 1813
IN MEMORY OF 20 GOOD AND TRUE KING'S MEN WHO,
IN FIGHTING IN DEFENCE OF THEIR COUNTRY, DIED
AND WERE BURIED ON THIS KNOLL
THIS REVISED INSCRIPTION AND STONE RE-DEDICATED
JUNE 6TH 1956
BY
HER MAJESTY'S ARMY AND NAVY VETERANS SOCIETY OF
HAMILTON
To the east of the monument lies a soldiers tomb, where remains of soldiers recovered from this area were interred. Further to the east lies a labyrinth. There is an engraved paving stone at the center of the labyrinth that reads:

In less than an hour on June 6th 1813,
some 40 British and American soldiers
died and over 300 were wounded, captured
or missing at the Battle of Stoney Creek.
The fiercest fighting took place
within a few meters of this spot

A nearby interpretive sign provides additional details:

The Battle of Stoney Creek was about to be lost. The daring night-time raid had begun well, penetrating the perimeter of the American camp undetected, but was now close to collapse. The strategy of a bayonet only assault on the American advance line floundered and the British troops, backlit by a line of campfires, came under heavy fire from the main American force posted along the ridge adjoining this knoll. Unit control broke down, many of the British broke and ran. The raid was about to become a reverse when Major Charles Plenderleath, commander of the 49th Regiment called for volunteers to rush the American artillery on this knoll, which had just been discharged. The attack was fronted by Sergeant Alexander Fraser of the 49th who led about thirty men, including his brother Corporal Peter Fraser, in a wild bayonet charge directly into the mouths of the American guns, before they could be fired again. Alexander stabbed seven Americans and Peter four.

Miraculously, this desperate action succeeded. The charge carried through the battery and scattered a line of infantry supporting the guns. In the ensuing melee the American commander, Brigadier General John Chandler and his second-in-command Brigadier General William Winder were both captured by Fraser. Plenderleath, wounded and unhorsed, was able to withdraw his men and prisoners, leaving the leaderless American army to begin a hasty retreat back to Niagara.

The charge, initiated by Plenderleath and executed by Fraser, was the turning point in the battle. For their service at Stoney Creek, Fraser was promoted from the ranks, ended the war a lieutenant, Plenderleath was awarded a knighthood

For more information about the Battle of Stoney Creek visit:
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/battle-of-stoney-creek-national-historic-site-of-canada/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stoney_Creek
www.battlefieldhouse.ca/battle.asp

Name of Battle:
Battle of Stoney Creek


Name of War: War of 1812

Entrance Fee: 0.00 (listed in local currency)

Parking: N 43° 13.050 W 079° 46.073

Date(s) of Battle (Beginning): 6/6/1813

Date of Battle (End): 6/6/1813

Visit Instructions:
Post a photo of you and/or your GPS in front of a sign or marker posted at the site of the battle.

In addition it is encouraged to take a few photos two of the surrounding area and interesting features at the site.
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