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King Edward III of England -- St. George's Chapel, Lower Ward, Winsdor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, UK
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Benchmark Blasterz
N 51° 29.010 W 000° 36.401
30U E 666175 N 5706310
Quick Description: The statue of King Edward III in a niche on the south side of St George's Chapel in the Lower Ward of Windsor Castle
Location: South East England, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 10/30/2016 11:23:55 AM
Waymark Code: WMTBYY
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member lumbricus
Views: 1

Long Description:
The statue of King Edward III at the St George's Chapel echoes a famous painting in the Royal collection of King Edward III wearing the crown of England and holding the crowns of France and Scotland on his sword.

The statue looks to be larger than life size, maybe 1.5-2x times life size since it is so far off the ground, it is hard to tell how large the statues are. King Edward is wearing flowing royal robes. He holds the Royal Orb in his left hand, a symbol of monarchy. In his right hand he holds an upright sword from its handle with the blade resting on his left shoulder. His face is recognizeable by its long beard.

King Edward III is important at Windsor not only because he was an English King but also because he founded the Order of the Garter and built St George's Chapel. It is therefore, appropriate that he be immortalized in a niche along its exterior wall.

From Wikipedia: (visit link)

"St George's Chapel

St George's Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England, United Kingdom. It is both a royal peculiar and the chapel of the Order of the Garter. The chapel is governed by the Dean and Canons of Windsor.

The chapel is located in the Lower Ward of the castle, which is one of the principal residences of Queen Elizabeth II.

The day-to-day running of the chapel is the responsibility of the religious College of St George, which is directed by a chapter of the dean and four canons, assisted by a clerk, virger (traditional spelling of verger) and other staffers. The Society of the Friends of St George's and Descendants of the Knights of the Garter, a registered charity, was established in 1931 to assist the College in maintaining the chapel.

History

In 1348, King Edward III founded two new religious colleges: St Stephen's at Westminster and St George's at Windsor. The new college at Windsor was attached to the Chapel of St Edward the Confessor which had been constructed by Henry III in the early thirteenth century. The chapel was then rededicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, St Edward the Confessor and St George the Martyr. Edward III also built the Aerary Porch in 1353–1354. It was used as the entrance to the new college.

St George's Chapel became the Mother Church of the Order of the Garter, and a special service is still held in the chapel every June and is attended by the members of the order. Their heraldic banners hang above the upper stalls of the choir where they have a seat for life.

The period 1475–1528 saw a radical redevelopment of St George's Chapel, set in motion by Edward IV and continued by Henry VII and Henry VIII. The thirteenth century Chapel of St Edward the Confessor was expanded into a huge new Cathedral-like chapel under the supervision of Richard Beauchamp, Bishop of Salisbury, and the direction of the master mason Henry Janyns. The Horseshoe Cloister was constructed for the new community of 45 junior members: 16 vicars, a deacon gospeller, 13 lay clerks, 2 clerks epistoler and 13 choristers.

St George's Chapel was a popular destination for pilgrims during the late medieval period. The chapel was purported to contain several important relics: the bodies of John Schorne and Henry VI of England and a fragment of the True Cross held in a reliquary called the Cross of Gneth. These relics all appear to have been displayed at the east end of the south choir aisle.

The Chapel suffered a great deal of destruction during the English Civil War. Parliamentary forces broke into and plundered the chapel and treasury on 23 October 1642. Further pillaging occurred in 1643 when the fifteenth-century chapter house was destroyed, lead was stripped off the chapel roofs, and elements of Henry VIII's unfinished funeral monument were stolen. Following his execution in 1649, Charles I was buried in a small vault in the centre of the choir at St George's Chapel which also contained the coffins of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour. A programme of repair was undertaken at St George's Chapel following the Restoration of the monarchy.

The reign of Queen Victoria saw further changes made to the architecture of the chapel. The east end of the choir was reworked in devotion to Prince Albert; the Lady Chapel, which had been abandoned by Henry VII, was completed; a royal mausoleum was completed underneath the Lady Chapel; and a set of steps were built at the west end of the chapel to create a ceremonial entrance to the building.

Queen's Beasts

On the roof of the chapel, standing on the pinnacles, and also on pinnacles on the sides, are seventy-six heraldic statues representing the Queen's (or King's) Beasts. They represent fourteen of the heraldic animals: the lion of England, the red dragon of Wales, the panther of Jane Seymour, the falcon of York, the black bull of Clarence, the yale of Beaufort, the white lion of Mortimer, the greyhound of Richmond, the white hart of Richard II, the collared silver antelope of Bohun, the black dragon of Ulster, the white swan of Hereford, the unicorn of Edward III and the golden hind of Kent. The original beasts dated from the sixteenth century, but were removed in 1682 on the advice of Sir Christopher Wren; the present statues date from 1925, when the chapel was restored."
Monarch Ranking: King / Queen

Proper Title and Name of Monarch: King Edward III of England

Country or Empire of Influence: England

Website for additonal information: [Web Link]

Visit Instructions:

Waymark Visitor - Must either

  • Provide a photo at the Statue
  • Answer a related question, if available, as posted on the Waymark description to the satistfaction of the Owner
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    Recent Visits/Logs:
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    Master Mariner visited King Edward III of England -- St. George's Chapel, Lower Ward, Winsdor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, UK 1/17/2017 Master Mariner visited it
    Benchmark Blasterz visited King Edward III of England -- St. George's Chapel, Lower Ward, Winsdor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, UK 7/26/2016 Benchmark Blasterz visited it

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