Charles Forest Nelson Pratt - Saugus, MA, USA
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Chasing Blue Sky
N 42° 27.877 W 071° 00.599
19T E 334751 N 4703321
Quick Description: The plaque honoring Charles Forest Nelson Pratt is near the Civil War Memorial, located in the public rotary in the center of Saugus, Massachusetts.
Location: Massachusetts, United States
Date Posted: 5/22/2013 10:34:03 AM
Waymark Code: WMH4PF
Published By: Groundspeak Regular Member Dunbar Loop
Views: 1

Long Description:
This bronze plaque is attached to a large rock, just south of the Civil War Memorial. It is located in the center of town in Saugus, Massachusetts. It is situated inside a large rotary, a keystone shaped roundabout, near city hall.

The plaque reads:

CHARLES FOREST NELSON PRATT

FEB. 4, 1891 - NOV. 5, 1968

DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF A MAN
WHO DEVOTED A LIFETIME IN SERVICE
TO HIS COMMUNITY AND THE GREATER
COMMUNITY OF MANKIND; WHOSE GUIDING
PRINCIPLE WAS TRUTH, AND WHOSE FAITH
IN HIS FELLOWMAN NEVER FALTERED.

DEDICATED OCT. 9, 1971

"Charles Forest Nelson Pratt was a Republican politician from Saugus, Massachusetts. He was born on February 4, 1891 in Saugus, Massachusetts. A graduate of Saugus High School, Northeastern University, and Boston University School of Law, During World War I he was a conscientious objector and was working at the A. E. Little shoe company.

Pratt served on the Saugus School Board from 1916 to 1919.

In 1919, Pratt was elected to the Board of Selectmen where he would later serve as chairman. In 1925, he made headlines for his plan to arm 100 hand-picked citizens in order to deter bandits from operating in Saugus. Pratt dropped his proposal for a "vigilance committee" at the next meeting.

In 1926, Pratt was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. He defeated Harriet Hart, the first woman ever elected to the Massachusetts General Court.

Pratt served from 1927 to 1935. Shortly after taking office he filed a bill to abolish capital punishment. He would file a similar bill at the beginning of each session he served.

Despite being a Republican, he supported president Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal and represented the National Shoe Workers during their 1933 strike. He was a member of the Banks and Banking and Counties commissions.

Pratt was an Essex County Commissioner from 1939 to 1943 and again from 1944 until his death in 1968. He would be the last Republican to serve as an Essex County Commissioner until Kevin Leach in 1991.

During his first year on the Commission, Pratt fought with fellow commissioners Frederick Butler and James D. Bentley. He felt that Butler kept all of the patronage and made all of the major appointments himself "aided and abetted by his own political appointee, Bentley". In the 1940 election, Pratt supported Butler's opponent for the Republican nomination, Tom Longworth. Butler was reelected, but Bentley lost to J. Fred Manning in the general election. After Manning took office, he voted to make Pratt chairman and sided with him on a number of issues, including making Commission meetings public.

Pratt lost to Bentley in 1942 after a recount. He was elected in 1944 and was seated early after Commissioners Manning and Arthur Thompson appointed fellow Commissioner Bentley to the post of Essex County treasurer. Thompson, whose term was expiring, was then chosen to succeed Bentley on the Commission and Pratt was appointed to Thompson's seat.

In his final years on the Commission, the body was criticized for making nepotistic appointments. Pratt had as many has seven family members employed by the county at one time. To address this, Pratt filed a bill with the state legislature that would have extended civil service to county employees. The legislature turned it down.

Pratt ran four times for Massachusetts's 7th congressional district seat. He lost the nomination in 1937 and the general election in 1934, 1936 and 1941. He also lost the nomination for the 6th congressional district seat to William H. Bates in 1950.

Pratt was a member of the Freemasons and the Odd Fellows.

Pratt was a candidate for reelection to the Essex County Commission in 1968. On Election Day, Pratt felt sick and returned home early from campaigning. He was later rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He lost his final election by 2,897 votes." (visit link)
Website with more information on either the memorial or the person(s) it is dedicated to: [Web Link]

Location: It is located within a public roundabout, shaped like a keystone, with Central Street intersecting it in the north and south direction and Main Street coming from the west, with Hamilton Street coming from the east.

Visit Instructions:
Add another photo of the memorial. You and/or your GPS can be in the photo, but this isn't necessary.
Search for...
Geocaching.com Google Map
Google Maps
MapQuest
Bing Maps
Trails.com Maps
Nearest Waymarks
Nearest Citizen Memorials
Nearest Geocaches
Nearest Benchmarks
Nearest Hotels
Create a scavenger hunt using this waymark as the center point
Recent Visits/Logs:
Date Logged Log  
Chasing Blue Sky visited Charles Forest Nelson Pratt - Saugus, MA, USA 5/10/2013 Chasing Blue Sky visited it