By using this site, you agree to its use of cookies as provided in our policy.

The Hugin - Pegwell Bay, Kent, UK
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member MeerRescue
N 51° 19.729 E 001° 22.375
31U E 386640 N 5687648
Quick Description: The Hugin, a 15 ton replica of a Viking ship built in Denmark and sailed to England in 1949.
Location: South East England, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 4/19/2012 7:06:45 AM
Waymark Code: WME8PZ
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Queens Blessing
Views: 1

Long Description:

The Hugin is a 15 ton replica of the 'Gokstad', a Viking ship excavated in 1880 in Sandefjord, Norway. It was built in Denmark and sailed to England in 1949 in recognition of the British involvement in ridding Scandinavia of the Nazi menace, and to celebrate the 1500th anniversary of the arrival in England of Hengist and his brother Horsa, the 'first' Anglo-Saxons who arrived in AD 449.

The crew of 53 Danes came across the old way, too, taking turns at the long oars, or slept roughly, lying on the deck beneath the gunwales. The only professional seaman aboard, Peter Jensen used the only instrument carried, a sextant, to bring them safely across the treacherous North Sea to the Thanet coastline, and safe landing on 28th July at Main Bay, Broadstairs, soon to be re-named Viking Bay. They were met by huge crowds, local dignitaries, and guest of honour, His Highness Prince George of Denmark. From their next port of call, Ramsgate, the Hugin was rowed all the way around the north Kent coastline and up the River Thames to Greenwich, before going on to Richmond. On 1st August 1949, in heavy rain, Hugin finally arrived in London and a celebration luncheon held at the Guildhall by Sir Percy Greenaway, acting Lord Mayor of London. It was announced shortly after that the newspaper The Daily Mail had purchased the Hugin and would send it on a tour around Britain's seaside resorts.

Following the tour, The Daily Mail newspaper announced their intention to present the Hugin to the towns of Ramsgate and Broadstairs to commemorate the original landing of Hengist and Horsa. On 28th July 1950, with much fanfare and in the presence once more of His Highness Prince George of Denmark and local dignitaries, an opening ceremony was held at Pegwell Bay for the presentation of Hugin to the Towns. A bonze plaque was unveiled which reads;

BOROUGH OF RAMSGATE/THE DANISH VIKING SHIP/"HUGIN"/WHICH SAILED TO BROADSTAIRS ON JULY 28th 1949/AND WAS PRESENTED BY/THE DAILY MAIL/TO THE TOWNS OF RAMSGATE AND BROADSTAIRS JOINTLY/ON JULY 28th 1950/TO COMMEMORATE THE ORIGINAL LANDING OF HENGIST AND HORSA/AT EBBSFLEET IN THIS VICINITY IN AD 449./PERCY TURNER -- MAYOR

The Hugin sits on permanent display on the cliff tops above Pegwell Bay and it can be safely said that almost every primary school child in Kent went on school visits to the Hugin for years,or so it seemed, and many still do. Sadly, the Hugin was in dire condition by the late 1990's, almost rotted away, but it was saved, restored and placed back on display once more. The Hugin is now covered over during the winter months, but from April time she is uncovered, her shields and oars placed back on board and once more holds pride of place on Hugin Green, Pegwell Bay.

Is there a tour: No

If boat is a garden what was planted in it: Not listed

Visit Instructions:
Photos.

What you thought of the location.
Search for...
Geocaching.com Google Map
Google Maps
MapQuest
Bing Maps
Trails.com Maps
Nearest Waymarks
Nearest Landlocked Boats
Nearest Geocaches
Nearest Benchmarks
Nearest Hotels
Create a scavenger hunt using this waymark as the center point
Recent Visits/Logs:
There are no logs for this waymark yet.