Texas Brigade Monument - Gettysburg, PA
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member Math Teacher
N 39° 47.423 W 077° 15.262
18S E 306971 N 4406923
Quick Description: This granite obelisk marks the general vicinity of the area occupied by Robertson's Texas Brigade at Gettysburg, prior to its attack on the Round Tops on July 2, 1863. The monument is located on South Confederate Avenue, Section 5.
Location: Pennsylvania, United States
Date Posted: 4/2/2012 8:54:13 AM
Waymark Code: WME4FB
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Lat34North
Views: 0

Long Description:

The Texas Brigade consisted of three Texas and one Arkansas infantry regiments. Those units were the 1st, 4th & 5th Texas Infantries and the 3rd Arkansas Infantry. The entire unit fell under the immediate command of Brigadier General Jerome Bonaparte Robertson (March 14, 1815 – January 7, 1890) until he was wounded on July 2nd. Robertson was a doctor, Indian fighter, Texas politician, and a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was noted for his service in the famed Texas Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.

The brigade, however, fell under the leadership of Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood, thus it is called Hood's Texas Brigade. Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood (June 29, 1831 – August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War. Hood had a reputation for bravery and aggressiveness that sometimes bordered on recklessness. Arguably one of the best brigade and division commanders in the Confederate States Army, Hood became increasingly ineffective as he was promoted to lead larger, independent commands late in the war, and his career was marred by his decisive defeats leading an army in the Atlanta Campaign and the Franklin-Nashville Campaign.

The Texas Brigade Monument is located on the west or right side South Confederate Avenue if traveling south, a few steps way from the Hood's Division Monument. The marker is located at the very top of the handle of a large 'soup ladle' of a turn, at least that is what is looks like on a map. Just .35 miles away is where South Confederate Avenue curves in a wide arc then repeats itself and curves again in the opposite direction just like a sine wave. The memorial faces due east and is located very close to the road, however, parky is tricky around here so exercise caution. Please do not park on the grass, park on the side of the road. I cannot emphasize that enough! I visited this monument on Saturday, March 10, 2012 at 4:36 PM, just before the clocks were set ahead for the Spring. I was at a 629 foot ASL elevation.

The Draw the Sword site helped out by the NPS narrative and the SIRIS site offers the following description: This was the first non-regimental Confederate monument at Gettysburg, placed here in 1913 (thus predating even the Virginia state monument) through the effort of a group of private citizens. In addition to honoring the 1st, 4th, and 5th Texas Regiments, this monument also honors the 3rd Arkansas Regiment. Monument is a granite shaft with apexed-top; and polished east face with inscriptions. This Confederate marker was erected by private contributions from persons in Texas, represented by Mrs. Mable M. Bates. It marks the area occupied by the Texas brigade at Gettysburg prior to its attack on the Round Tops on July 2, 1863. It was dedicated on Sept. 17, 1913.

The monument was erected on June 1, 1885. This Confederate marker was erected by private contributions from persons in Texas, represented by Mrs. Mable M. Bates. The monument is made of granite and SIRIS lists the dimensions as: Approx. 6 ft. 5 in. x 1 ft. 10 in. x 1 ft. 8 in. The brief inscription on the front side reads:

C.S.A.
Hood's Texas Brigade
Brig - General
J.B. Robertson
Commanding
1st, 4th, 5th Texas, 3d Arkansas
Infantry Regiments
July 2d. and 3d. 1863.


The Texas Brigade Monument is a contributing feature to the Gettysburg National Military Park Historic District which is nationally significant under NR Criteria A, B, C & D. Areas of Significance: Military, Politics/Government, Landscape Architecture, Conservation, Archeology-Historic. Period of Significance: 1863-1938. The original National Register Nomination was approved by the Keeper March 19, 1975. An update to this nomination was approved by the Keeper on January 23, 2004. The monument is identified as structure number MN081.

From the Nomination Form:
Marks general vicinity of area occupied by Robertson's Texas Brigade at Gettysburg, prior to its attack on the Round Tops on July 2, 1863.Located on Confederate Ave, Section 5.

Short Physical Description:
Granite shaft w/ apex top resting on base 1'10"x1'8" at base, 6'5" high. All face rough hewn except E which is polished. Inscription is cut into polished face.

Long Physical Description:
Monument is a granite shaft with apex top that rests on a 1.1x1.8 foot base. Overall height is 6.5 foot. All faces are rough hewn except the east, which is polished. An inscription is cut into the polished face. Located on Confederate Ave near its junction with the Emmitsburg Road.


My Sources
1. NRHP Nomination Form
2. SIRIS
3. Stone Sentinels
4. Virtual Gettysburg
5. Draw the Sword
6. Historical Marker Database
7. Wikipedia

Date Installed or Dedicated: 9/27/1913

Name of Government Entity or Private Organization that built the monument: This Confederate marker was erected by private contributions from persons in Texas, represented by Mrs. Mable M. Bates.

Union, Confederate or Other Monument: Confederate

Rating (1-5):

Related Website: [Web Link]

Photo or photos will be uploaded.: yes

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