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King George III - London, England, UK
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Metro2
N 51° 31.131 W 000° 07.573
30U E 699376 N 5711441
Quick Description: George III was the first King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
Location: London, United Kingdom
Date Posted: 1/10/2012 7:17:11 PM
Waymark Code: WMDFYP
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member The Blue Quasar
Views: 3

Long Description:
Located inside the British Museum which does not charge an admission fee and DOES allow non-flash photography, this marble bust of George III (1738-1820) depicts him as a younger man wearing a high collar and what would appear to be a cape under which he has sash and medal. The 1767 sculpture is by John van Nost the Younger.

George had lived longer and had had the longest reign of any British monarch at that time. He is perhaps most remembered for having been King when the American colnies gained independence and for his bouts with mental illness.
Wikipedia (visit link) further informs us:

"George III lived for 81 years and 239 days and reigned for 59 years and 96 days: both his life and his reign were longer than those of any of his predecessors. Only Queen Victoria and Elizabeth II lived and reigned longer.

George III was dubbed "Farmer George" by satirists, at first mocking his interest in mundane matters rather than politics but later to contrast his homely thrift with his son's grandiosity and to portray him as a man of the people.[113] Under George III, who was passionately interested in agriculture,[114] the British Agricultural Revolution reached its peak and great advances were made in fields such as science and industry. There was unprecedented growth in the rural population, which in turn provided much of the workforce for the concurrent Industrial Revolution.[115] George's collection of mathematical and scientific instruments is now housed in the Science Museum (London); he funded the construction and maintenance of William Herschel's forty-foot telescope, which was the biggest ever built at the time.[116] Herschel discovered the planet Uranus, which he at first named Georgium Sidus (George's Star) after the King, in 1781.

George III himself hoped that "the tongue of malice may not paint my intentions in those colours she admires, nor the sycophant extoll me beyond what I deserve",[117] but in the popular mind George III has been both demonised and praised. While very popular at the start of his reign, by the mid-1770s George had lost the loyalty of revolutionary American colonists,[118] though it has been estimated that as many as half of the colonists remained loyal.[119] The grievances in the United States Declaration of Independence were presented as "repeated injuries and usurpations" that he had committed to establish an "absolute Tyranny" over the colonies. The Declaration's wording has contributed to the American public's perception of George as a tyrant. Contemporary accounts of George III's life fall into two camps: one demonstrating "attitudes dominant in the latter part of the reign, when the King had become a revered symbol of national resistance to French ideas and French power", while the other "derived their views of the King from the bitter partisan strife of the first two decades of the reign, and they expressed in their works the views of the opposition".[120] Building on the latter of these two assessments, British historians of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, such as Trevelyan and Erskine May, promoted hostile interpretations of George III's life. However, in the mid-twentieth century the work of Lewis Namier, who thought George was "much maligned", kick-started a re-evaluation of the man and his reign.[121] Scholars of the later twentieth century, such as Butterfield and Pares, and Macalpine and Hunter, are inclined to treat George sympathetically, seeing him as a victim of circumstance and illness. Butterfield rejected the arguments of his Victorian predecessors with withering disdain: "Erskine May must be a good example of the way in which an historian may fall into error through an excess of brilliance. His capacity for synthesis, and his ability to dovetail the various parts of the evidence ... carried him into a more profound and complicated elaboration of error than some of his more pedestrian predecessors ... he inserted a doctrinal element into his history which, granted his original aberrations, was calculated to project the lines of his error, carrying his work still further from centrality or truth."[122] In pursuing war with the American colonists, George III believed he was defending the right of an elected Parliament to levy taxes, rather than seeking to expand his own power or prerogatives.[123] In the opinion of modern scholars, during the long reign of George III the monarchy continued to lose its political power, and grew as the embodiment of national morality."
Monarch Ranking: King / Queen

Proper Title and Name of Monarch: George III, King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover

Country or Empire of Influence: United Kingdom and of Hanover

Website for additonal information: [Web Link]

Visit Instructions:

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  • Provide a photo at the Statue
  • Answer a related question, if available, as posted on the Waymark description to the satistfaction of the Owner
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