John Gibbon
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member Sneakin Deacon
N 38° 52.825 W 077° 04.340
18S E 320242 N 4305547
Quick Description: General John Gibbon is best known for his service during the western campaigns against the Indians. He was in charge of the troops who were sent to rescue and bury members of Custer’s 7th Cavalry following the Battle of the Little Big Horn.
Location: Virginia, United States
Date Posted: 7/13/2011 2:05:33 PM
Waymark Code: WMC19Z
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member rangerroad
Views: 0

Long Description:
John Gibbon's name was closely associated with two major Indian campaigns during his frontier service: the Sioux Campaign of 1876 and the Nez Perce Campaign of 1877. In the former, Gibbon commanded the Montana Column which rescued the survivors and buried the dead of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer's 7th Cavalry after the battle with Teton Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians on the Little Bighorn River. In the latter, although his force was outnumbered, Gibbon attacked Chief Joseph's band of Nez Perce at Big Hole, Montana Territory. The battle was actually a tactical defeat for Gibbon's small force, but the losses inflicted on the Nez Perce helped bring the campaign to a swift conclusion.

General John Gibbon died on February 6, 1896 and is resting in Section 2 - Grave 986 in Arlington National Cemetery.

Source/Credit: (visit link)
Description:
John Gibbon was born on April 20, 1827 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. As a boy he lived with his parents in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was appointed to the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1847 with classmates A. P. Hill and Ambrose Burnside. After graduating from West Point he served in Florida against the Seminole. He also served as an artillery instructor and Quartermaster at West Point.

During the Civil War, several members of the Gibbons family joined the Confederate Army, but John chose to remain loyal to the Union. In May 1862, he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General and assigned to the “Iron Brigade.” Gibbons was active throughout the Civil War seeing action at 2nd Manassas, Fredericksburg, The Wildeness and Petersburg. He was promoted to the rank of Major General in June 1864. General John Gobbon’s was present at Appomattox and was one of the commissioners designated to receive the formal surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia.

Following the Civil War, Gibbon was posted in the western frontier where he saw action against the Indians. Gibbon’s was in command of the Montana Column was assigned the take of burying the dead following the Battle of the Little Big Horm. Later Gibbons was in command of soldiers who pursued and attacked the Nez Perce lead by Chief Joseph at Big Hole, Montana. Most consider the attack by Gibbons troops to be a defeat, The losses they inflicted on the Nez Perce helped bring the campaign to a faster conclusion.

Gibbon commanded the Montana Column which rescued the survivors and buried the dead of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer's 7th Cavalry after the battle with Teton Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians on the Little Bighorn River. In the latter, although his force was outnumbered, Gibbon attacked Chief Joseph's band of Nez Perce at Big Hole, Montana Territory. The battle was actually a tactical defeat for Gibbon's small force, but the losses inflicted on the Nez Perce helped bring the campaign to a swift conclusion.
General John Gibbon retired from military service in 1891 and make his home in Baltimore, Maryland. General Gibbon died on February 6, 1896 and is resting in Section 2 – Grave 986 at Arlington National Cemetery.


Date of birth: 4/20/1827

Date of death: 2/6/1896

Area of notoriety: Military

Marker Type: Headstone

Setting: Outdoor

Visiting Hours/Restrictions: Daily - 8 a.m to 5 p.m.

Fee required?: No

Web site: [Web Link]

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