Dundonald Homestead, Greenvale, Victoria
Posted by: Groundspeak Regular Member hi pressure
S 37° 39.232 E 144° 52.499
55H E 312544 N 5830463
Quick Description: The site of Dundonald Homestead
Location: Victoria, Australia
Date Posted: 4/28/2010 5:11:08 PM
Waymark Code: WM8PQ7
Published By: Groundspeak Premium Member Rebel Acts
Views: 8

Long Description:
The Dundonald homestead, since demolished, was a single storey timber house with a
gabled roof, a verandah on the eastern side and stone steps leading up to it from the front
garden. There was a detached kitchen and maids room on the west side of the house. Little
remains of the house, just steps, stump footings, scatterings of bricks, a fireplace, paving,
concrete, cement-sheet remnants, and the remains of a tank stand.
A little to the north was a two storey granite stables, which had a loft upstairs accessible
by external stairs, and a carriage room and stables on the ground floor. A timber dairy was built
onto the back wall of the stables. Some of this, including the granite stairway, some lower
walls, a massive granite lintel and pieces of timber beams and iron, survive.
Around the homestead there is the evidence of a small ornamental garden (Cotoneaster
Lilac Privet and a well-established Cape Honeysuckle hedge), and a large area of parkland
planting.
The large area of parkland planting - mainly conifers - probably dates from the
construction of the house, perhaps in the 1850s or 60s. The planting includes some outstanding
specimens - a Stone Pine (Pinus pinea) which is of regional significance, Norfolk Island Pine
(Arancaria heterophylla), Hoop Pine (Arancaria cunninghamii), Bunya Bunya Pine (Arancaria
bidwilli), Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla), and Italian Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens).
All are fine specimens and significant landscape features due to their size and form. They are
landmarks in the area being clearly visible from the Tullamarine Freeway and Mickleham Road.
The conservation and interpretation of this exotic planting is recommended along with
the stable and house ruins. Control of noxious weeds, especially boxthorn, is required.
There are remains of granite quarrying all around the Dundonald site. These are of
State significance. The most obvious marks of quarrying would appear to date to later periods,
but some are likely to date to the 1840s period.
Age/Event Date: Early 1850's

Type of Historic Marker: If other (please specify)

Type of Historic Marker if other: A sign at the site with the ruins.

Related Website: [Web Link]

Historic Resources.: Not listed

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