Aztec Hotel - Monrovia, CA
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member silverquill
N 34° 09.086 W 118° 00.349
11S E 407278 N 3779403
Quick Description: On old Route 66, the Aztec Hotel opened in 1925 as the most ornate hotel in Monrovia, California. Designed by Robert Stacy-Judd to reflect Mayan (not Aztec) it became the hangout of celebrities - and ghosts that still walk the halls.
Location: California, United States
Date Posted: 2/11/2008 9:09:59 AM
Waymark Code: WM354D
Published By: Groundspeak Charter Member GEO*Trailblazer 1
Views: 177

Long Description:

From the website of the Aztec Hotel Spirits

In the twenties or thirties a tragic accident occurred to a young couple in room 120. During their lovemaking, the wife fell off the bed and hit her head on the radiator, causing her death. Every room located west of room 120, which includes rooms 118, 116 and 114, etcetera, has been without heat since the misfortune. Time and time again, the heating system is checked out, but it is always found to be in working order

Female ghosts appear to haunt the ladies room in the lobby across from the main desk. They open and shut locked doors just before an icy chill descends over the room. Others have been seen floating through the halls of the once celebrated Aztec Hotel.

Guests report the appearance of a lady who is dressed in white and in the style of the 1920's or 1930's. Her presence is always accompanied by the cold chilled associated with spirits from beyond.

When it opened on September 6, 1925; the Aztec Hotel was not only the most ornate hotel in the city of Monrovia, it was also the completion of the first architectural attempt to apply the principles of Mayan art and architecture to modern American buildings.

The hotel was designed by the quirky Los Angeles architect Robert B. Stacy-Judd who attributed the inspiration for this design to John L. Stephen's incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatan (1841), a work which expounded on the importance of Mayan contributions to the architecture and included a number of engravings by Frederick Catherwood.



The misnomer "Aztec" was given to the structure by Stacy-Judd because he believed that the general public was better acquainted with that tribe than the Mayan culture. Judd was known to refer to its style as "Mayan Revival."

The Aztec Hotel had opened with great fanfare and for several years was the most exclusive hotel in the area. But historians say it may have been to fantastic in appearance for success. Monrovia financiers, who had put up the money to build their hotel during the boom years of the early 20's, quickly became disenchanted investors when the hotel closed during the Great Depression. The building was sold at auction for $50,000. Since then, the Aztec has had varying fortunes. When nearby Santa Anita Race Track opened in the 1930's, the hotel was renovated and opened to host such celebrities as Bing Crosby and Mickey Rooney.

The original tile floor remains in perfect condition and the dome-shaped windows are original. Stained glass, well-preserved murals, lighting fixtures, a unique fireplace, and Mayan sculptures remain from the original design. Stop to take a look at this bit of Southern California's history, there is much to see in this unique piece of architecture.

The Aztec Hotel was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978 and underwent major renovations in 2002, preserving this historic landmark as a destination for travelers and facility for local gatherings.
Public access?:
Open during the day, and to guests


Website about the location and/or story: [Web Link]

Visting hours: Not listed

Visit Instructions:
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